Newspaper Archive of
Monroe Historical Society
Monroe, Washington
October 30, 1925     Monroe Historical Society
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October 30, 1925
 

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Friday, October 30, 1925. I Friday, October 16, 1925 Page Three I KENNEDY Model XX--- Union High Hchool Monroe! Wash. A Newer and Receiver You who have hesitated to own your own radio receiver for any reason whatsoever will be first to want the KENNEDY Model XX. And you who already own your set will see in it many new advan- tages that make it most desirable. Editor-in-chief .............. Harold Bailey i Associate Editors ............ Dan Connelly Ruth Hatch Feature Editor ................ Howell Jones Sports Editor .............. Wilford Reaper Typist ...................... Elva MacDougall Faculty Addsor--Mrs. O. ,L. MacNee I MOTTO: We strive for golden opin- ions from all sorts of people." That&apos;s how good a set the KENNEDY Model XX is! Student Conference Sometimes people are lucky and ..-._. sometimes they are not. These people -+::'r-'--ir =<-: : " happened to be lucky. Last Thursday / four members of the high school, in-  cludingateacher, journeyed to Seattle !1::/! to attend the Student Conference at ::,i i,,l,, the University of Washington. The lucky members were 'Harold Bailey, Robert Newell, Elva MacDougall, ,Z. 'l;, Laura Kennon and Miss Sherrill. Two  students attended the Leaders Con- ference and two the Journalism Con- ference. $149 so ON EASY TERMS No Charge for Installing COMPLETE One dial simplifies operation; new construction details afford ac- curate, precise control; tone and' volume are surprisingly fine. With the Model XX you select the station you want to hear--the set does the rest. ThedinEa Hardware Co, "EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE" MONROE, WASH Also Radiola, Freshman Masterpiece and Fae[a Radios S P EC I.Di+LS for Satut lay Pot Roast .......................................................... 15c pound Round Steak .................................................... 20c pound Loin Steak ........................................................ 20c pound Veal Steak ........................................................ 25c pound They left the high school about three-thirty Thursday and arrived' in Seattle about five. After enrolling, they were assigned to various houses. The boys were fortunate. They stay- ed at the Psi Upsilon. (George Stew- art is a member of this house.) They have a fine house, one of the best on the campus. The firs meeting in the morning was an Opening Assembly held at Meay Hall. Here the delegates were welcomed by Chalmer Walters, Pres- ident of the A. S. U. W., and a wel- come add'ress was given by John T. Condor.. Dean of Faculties, University of Wshington. A ectional meeting was held at tea o'clock. The subject was "Organ- ization of Boys' Clubs" by L.T. Baker, principal ef Burlingto high school. This is one thing Monroe high school does not have. Outside of the Boys' club, Monroe high school ran a close first with the other high schools in student activities. An active assembly was held at eleven o'clock. All the delegates heard' the coaches of all the different teams give shert talks, which were enjoyed immensel.v. Girls Entertained by Kappa Kappa Gamma M. U. H. S. certainly appreciates the fine treatment of their girl dele- - gates by the members .of the Kappa Kappa Gamma. They were received most cordially by the president of the House and the house mother. Each girl seemed to make it her special duty to make the guests feel at home and' not one moment spent inside the four walls of this hospitable house was lacking in interest and' fun. Girl Students' Conference at U. of W. At ten o'clock Friday morning, all  the girls' leaders' from the different high schools represented met in the Social 'Hall, Home Economics build.. ing. Lora Harvey, president of We-i men's Federation, gave the girls a '"Word of Greeting," after which, the "Washington High School Girls Code" was presented by Marguerite Wiley, Yakima High School. It was decided that each club in the different high i schools of the state would have a specific code which .only their club would be obliged to follow. The gen-. eral code for the state of Washington is as follows: W e believe in the joy of living Active leadershin wherever our in- fluence can help S cholarship and service High sandards of character I ncreasin vision as we go along l" /7 NAr/O,V-w/o [enney009. PAINT STOI Everett, Wash. WET WEATHER FOOTWEAR Hood R0000bl00ers oi Are you buying first quality rubbers--and are you buying them at the right price? It's money in your pocket to find this out for yourself. We sell Hood Rubber Company's First Quality Rubber Footwear, and--though we do not mean to boast--our 676 stores do sell a considerable number of rubbers in a season--enough to give us quite a saving in the price on every pair. These savings are passed on to our customers. Are you taking advantage of them? You will find that they are really worthwhile. MEN'S RUBBER BOOTS Red rubber, full welt sole, extra weight and strength; knee height. A boot that will stand the test of hard wear. Pair 5.90 MEN'S GREY RUBBER KNEE BOOTS Extra heavy weight boots, re-inforeed where the wear is greatest--one of our nation-wide values. Pair 4.98 MEN'S MEDIUM WEIGHT KNEE BOOTS Re-enforced thruout. Welt soles. A Splen- did value at this low price. Pair 3.98 MEN'S HEAVY LOW RUBBERS A red sole rubber with extra heavy grey upper that will stand a lot of rough use. Pair 1.49 Bright .finish, pure gum, light weight rub- bers in all sizes, for 'every member of the family. Rubbers that will give the utmost service for the money expended. Men's sizes--pair .................................... $1.23 Boys' sizes--pair ........................................ 98c Youths' sizes--pair .................................... 89c Women's storm rubbers .......................... 79c Women's Footholds .................................... 59c Misses' Storm rubbers .............................. 69c Children's storm rubbers ........................ 59c Boys' Heavy Storm rubbers ................ $1.29 MEN'S LEATHER SHOES Especially made for wet weather. Men's 12-inch Hi-Cut--full moccasin toe, welt sole, with full weather-strip. Composition sole and heel that will outwear leather. Pair 6.90 MEN'S REGULAR LIGHT WORK SHOE Dark Brown, extra heavy upper, full double sole, welt sewed. A splendid shoe for this time of the year. The price is low. 4.98 MEN'S PLAIN TOE HEAVY WORK SHOE Made of heavy veal leather that is water repellent. 3/ bellows tongue. A shoe for real hard service. Note the low price. 3.98 conducting an extensive advertising campaign. Saturday morning the final Business Manager's session was held in Philoso- delegates got a general idea of col- lege life. H.B. Editors' Section of Journalism The High School Press Conference of the Star; E. B. Ault, publisher of the Union Record and R. Brougham, managing editor of the P.-I. Many interesting details of jour- Veal Roast ............................................ :. .......... 25c pound Rib Boiling Meat ........................................ 121/e pound Veal Stew ...................................................... 120 pound Chops ................................................................ 30 pound O. K. MARl [t g]" A. G. ROSS Phone 1951 Monroe # Let Us Do Your Printing WRITE TODAY DON't DELAY I To any one [ *'', [ who will prove [ &'7.. I th I sl YOUR OPPORTUNITY - [ ad is misrepre- [ OU 0 ORTUNITY [ sented or-un-[ To purchase direct from the Ltrue. [ manufacturer a fine qtiality suit - I $50.00. Strictly hand-tailored to your measure, serge or worsted. Latestdtl AA models. Single or double breasted for ONLY a Send No Money--Write for our Special Offer. Per- fect Fit and Satisfaction Guarantee Ladies' $10.00 Six Pair Ladies light or heavy full fash- ioned pure SILK ttOSE valued at $10 for only $1.00 B0000]DIZ0000m00l Gentlemen's +,,K .os00 $1.00 Guaranteed Perfect and Finest Quality THE ALLIED SALES CO., 150 NASSAU ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. I Twelve Pair Men's light or heavy pure SILK HOSE valued at $10 for only $1.00 SEND NO MONEY Write us at once for full bargain offer to, N oteworthy effort for constant ira- phy hall. "A Good+ Business Organ- .... i ization" was spoken and by Ted Carl- prov.,,, ' i Giving our best to work and' play son of the graduate manager's offce; Wruthfulness in word, thought and 1 .e}, ng .meas zor ne _-.zg ., deed raper, was raKen care oi. oy y Obedience to the o idln voice I Young, business manager of the U. wi""  '" " i of W Daily Fred Braid advertising mm us I " of'the Seattle '" N atural expression of our natural manager Tm_s]:.:lalkad selve [ oil elllng Ao pace, a ne p u G pod sportsmanship on getting this. _..__ _...  imprtan business. ooking our best, acting our best, I The. final speecUbunetVemaaZeA-; L attaining our best; for out of co, ormer ....... s .....  . these come the durable satis- I lne.olumns,.  r*.mg ,.s- factions and lorious o,,s of veruser, l m me avmzy o sans y ... "   l a customer an bring him back the nze " " th t -- " " " " "l .... h second, third and fourth time a A aascusslon was men ne(l v '" "'" " " -- n" " "l Helen Gorham presiding. Different. u212s.up - a vusness a" +-A r ouja :a2e ways were suggested for getting the i .,' ':'v=cl'oo 1 .(ourn'al'ist code across to every girl so that it :Y .__. _"[_.: . _%:__ J: ^.,: .... would mean the most to her. How d can we have every girl abide by the t hfJeareeareU+, ,, Th^ -onfer code of the state as well as that of i v "= =P ............. " ence ended with a game between the school which she belongs? By Washington and Whitman. Beside printing it in the school paper; by the valuable information received, the making small cards and giving one to each glrl; by having the code framed and placed' in a consvicuous place, or by having the girls read one line every day and abiding by each one as the weeks continue. Business Manager's Section of Journalism Friday morning the Business ::Sec- tion was held in Meany Hall, with two interesting and instructive talks on schedule. Wayne Doty, of the Western Engraving Co., talked on the '"High School Public Budget." Meet- ing expenses is a problem of all high school publications. Bill Horsley, of the Izzard Advertising Agency, talk- ed on Effective Advertising, show- ing how high school papers could make their ads of value to their cus- tomers aml thus build up a bigger advertising business. In. Commerce Hall Friday after- noon, Lloyd Spencer, advertising man- ager of the Seattle P.-I. spoke on "Service to the Advertiser," giving valuable tips on how to make ad- vertising more effective. "The Busi- ness Side of a Community Paper,' was given by John H. Reid, publisher of the University District Herald. Mr. Reid stressed the point that a newspaper office mus be run on an efficient and orderly business basis the same as any other enterprise. Robert W. Jones, assistant professor of journalism, gave the topic, "Good Ad Copy," telling the best and surest wording of ads to attract attefition, and discussing the best arrangement of the indiviual advertisements. The last talk was by Henry Burd, asso- ciate professor of business adminis- tration on "Advertising Campaigns.' Mr." Bard reviewed the different methods used by large concerns in was divided into two parts, the edi- tors' section and. the business mana- gers' section. Friday morning Harold Bailey and' Laura Kennon attended i this editors' section in Meany Hall, where they listened to instructive speeches by Mathew O'Connor, in- structor i newswriting at the U. of W., and Charles Coleman, editor of the P.-I. Friday afternoon they attended the sessions in Philosophy Hall, where the speakers were: Lyle Spencer, di- rector of School of Journalism; Wal- ter Lamb, editor of The Columns; R. Buchanan, executive editor of the Times and Abe Smith, manager of the Seattle branch of Associated Press. Saturday morning in Philosophy Hall, they were given interesting facts and pointers on journalism by Cliff Harrison, sports editor of the Times; Ray Felton, managing editor nalism and a more thorough know- ledge of how to edit a hi-school paper was brought back to be made use of by the new Hi-School paper soo to be published by the students of the M, U. H. S. Delegates Banqueted On Friday evening at 6:30, the Conferencd Banquet took place, in the University Commons. Toastmaster for the banquet was Professor Clark P. Bissett, of the School of Law. Heads of the different University ac- tivities spoke to the delegates in a witty manner. Webster Augustine one of our Monroe boys, also exhib- ited his skill in making the after dinner speech. The delegates and visitors were kept laughing continu- ally by the entertainment which fol- lowed. A Jew, whose looks and man- ner bespoke the characters in his (Continued on page 6) Hot cakes that are golden, brown and feather-light ! Every time you make them. How? Flapjack! Whether your memory is longmr ehort, there's just one word you need to remember in buying pancake flour: Flapjad(! Your grocer has it in the handy round carton with the replaceable li& "Albers stands for Bater Bre.akfasu"