Newspaper Archive of
Monroe Historical Society
Monroe, Washington
October 2, 1925     Monroe Historical Society
PAGE 10     (10 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 10     (10 of 10 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 2, 1925
 

Newspaper Archive of Monroe Historical Society produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2020. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page Ten THE MONROE MONITOR--Monroe, Washington Friday, October 2, 1925. "1 | R. J. STRETCH COMPANY THE STORE OF THE PEOPLE k All Coffee--No Tin I All Cocoas--No Tin [ I All Tea--No Tin 50c lb.---3 lbs. $1.45 I L 25c per pound ! L -lb. pkff. 35c---1-1b. pkff. 65e SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK BEGINNING OCT. 12: : , {Air KNS, ......................................................... 37  LOG CABIN SYRUP, € 1 f17 FANCY HARD MIXED CANDY, X_ Large size ...............................................  Ilmv. 2 lbs. for .................. i .......................................... t$C SPERRY PANCAKE FLOUR., A BOOTH'S SARDINES, A' 10-lb. sacks ...................................................... 0’ 2 for ............................................ . ....................... Z0’ i SEEDLESS RAISINS, 4-lb. pkgs.. CRO% JIFFY ROLLED OATS, Large pkgs, (Premium) SATURDAY SPECIAL--PURE LARD, 38C 2 lbs. for .............................................................. ' QUALITY SERVICE SATISFACTION OPEN SATURDAYS UNTIL 9 P. M. FHO'NE 1533--1543 R. J. STRETCH COMPANY--THE BEST PLACE TO SHOP, _AFTER ALL WAREHOUSE 261 T Washington, D. C., Sept. 26, 1925. Prices of all grains declined sharply during the week ending September 26, according to the Weekly Grain Market Review of the United States department of agriculture. Continued' favorabl reports increas- hag the world's supply of bread grains and heavy movement of Canadian wheat were the principal weakening features in the wheat market. Rus- sian wheat was reported as being of- fered in the London market at $1.42 per bushel and offerings of Argen- tine wheat in the European markets were reported below quotations on Canadian wheat. Harvest returns in- dicate that the Canadian crop will probably be larger than the latest official estimate, and this together with the heavier movement depressed the Winnepeg market. Premiums on cash wheat at Winnipeg declined and certain grates of Canadian wheat are now upon a price basis that they can be imported into the United States in spite of the duty. Canadian mills were also offering flour in east- ern United States markets duty paid at comp2titive prices with flour from American mills. These weakening influences were principally responsible for a decline of nearly 10 cents in the wheat fu- tures markets in this country. Pre- miums for cash spring wheat, how- ever, held at fairly firm premiums above futures prices. 12 per cent [protein No. 1 Dark Northern wheat !was quoted at Minneapolis at 6-10c over the September price; 12½ per cent, 9-14c over, and 13 per cent 13- 17c over. Cash offerings were well absorbed although milling demand was less active. The hard' winter wheat markets were dull and lower with futures and because .of the slow flour demand. The scarcity of good milling wheat, however, resulted in a slight increase m premiums, No. 2 hard winter at Kansas City 12-12½ per cent protein being quoted at 13c over the Decem- ber price. 13 per cent protein was quoted at 13½e ove. Soft winter wheat also declined around 10c per bushel with a material slackening in the mill demand. Re- ceipts from the country were'light and at several markets were mostly of poor quality. At Cincinnati late USED-CAR SALE threshed wheat which was damaged by the rains sold at discounts 30-40c per bushel below prices of No. 2 red winter. Pacific Coast wheat markets were also dull. Some small lots were sold to fill lot space to the Orient but there was practically no new business for export• Further export trade with the Orient, however, is expected if prices remain at present or at a lowee level. Stocks in warehouses are lar,e with farmers more inclined to sell than earlier in the season. Milling amounts have gone into storage, in-! creasing commercial stocks to a rcc-:] erd arrount for this time of the year. i I There has been some export d'emand and nearly 14,000,000 bushels have l been exorted since the first of July. Mixed feeds manufacturers are also! using larger amounts of oats and i feeders are also substituting oats for: hiher priced grain where practi- cable. ! Weakness in the wheat market and the absence of any important export demand caused further decline in the demand limited but mills are obtain-!rye market and this grain is selling -- flour business from the' between 65e and 70c below wheat' h, some  I • • "" • l " ,,., I Southeast. Some wheat also sold for i Pl'cSa:ricae va:I°ay:ra?l'it sV:me i shipment eastward. P , more than adequate for the curreno I The prospect of an ear!y and h.avy needs in the absence of an export de-; movement of corn togener wlTn a k " . . . • . . • • • . . . . . . - . i mano. foe t3arley marKe also WORK-i llml5e(l aemancr lorcea corn prices _J ,_ . - • -- . , eu lower wln an exrremelv neavy down about 10c per bushel at tne - . • . .  .... l movement of Canadmn' barley and l ilnCl at markers epemDer corn • ,  • • • ; -., P" P • , .  '.alSO larger offerings a several oI ne at Chicago is now scout res,Z°C o perlnrincipalnd' markets in this country.[ bushel lower than at the core p ,-]Export business on the Pacific Coast I lag time last year. Feeders tOOK • " "lwas ver" dull Feed barley was mov ' limited aantities at the various mar- : .... Y, " ..... n-., r'--  q" ,,  ,  my- SmWly wire ouyers 1 ulreren• j kets but buyers generally were mlC-iChoice h=,in, hnrlov L hoonmin, mg only sufficient corn for their, im ........... " .......... ' • . :lscarce in California and premiums! mediate needb and industries and • " r for this quality are about 30c over p other lar e bu ers generally were g Y , The l feed barley paces at San Francisco, awaiting new crop movemen wh-r- choice bre ..... • • - - •  " • "r e e wing parley was lower prates cneegea or[erlngs ol " ' quoted at $1 90 for 100 pounds New new corn to arrive and offerings of Cal: .... " " " " •'" " • . . I Jxornla oarlev on sample sold in old corn were only mouerate ..... • ..... • . I the London market at $2.65-$2.70. uas prices aecnneo wltn corn ana is.._^_:_ o-,:*---: .... - - -  t I u € 11. IUF %.21.1110 Y111 a wa. ( LIUeO, a at the close of the week were uu - ........... , ,.,• I.uO-d.OO C. I.I. poT sample u- 2c below last year s prices. Tnere --rior bar'e ......... 1 • . p-  y was quoea a  Z" or  per has been a good demand because oi .A' • . ,  ±uu pounas. the relatively low prices and Ja,'ge • " I The flax market declined about 8c because of the extreme weakness in other grMns and' lower Argentine :prices. There was practically no change in the general market situa- !tion. Movement continued heavy and erushers eontinued to absorb the cur- rent arrivals. Spot seed at Minne- apolis sold at the September priee to 2e over. Trade estimates indicate that possibly 20-25 per cent of the flax crop in the United States has left farmers hands. WE FIND WE HAVE TOO MANY USED CARS ON HAND AT THIS TIME OF YEAR. WE NEED MONEY AND MORE ROOM FOR USED CARS THAT WILL COME IN THIS FALL ON OUR NEW CHEVROLET CARS. THEREFORE WE ARE CUTTING THE PRICES ON ALL USED CARS TO THE LOWEST POSSI- BLE PRICES. Better Look These Over 1920 1923 1923 1924 1924 1924 1924 1918 Chev. Touring ..................... :$115.00 Chev. Touring ........................ $315.00 Chev. Touring ........................ $325.00 Chev. Touring ........................ $395.00 Chev. Roadster .................... $400.00 Chev. sport model .............. $435.00 Chev. Delivery. ...................... $385.00 Chev. Baby Grand ................ $135.00 SPECIAL Chev. Touring, good shape....$85.00 1920 Ford Touring, overhauled....$135-00 1920 Ford Touring, good con- dition ........................................ $125.00 1921 Ford Touring, overhauled $155.00 1923 Ford Coupe, many extras....$325.00 1924 Ford Coupe, first class ........ $415.00 1918 Buick Touring, real good .... $85.00 -SPECIAL 19o0 Chev. bug ................................ $115.00 1920 TERMS TERMS WE TRADE Nugent Motor Co. "Courtesy After the Sale" Washington Monroe Phone 163 Not the Same "Kitty" The other evening Jimmy's mother was settling herself down for a good read when he saw her small son stride over to the window, seize the kitten that was dozing on the ledge, and, swinging it about by Its tall, give It a vigorous shaking. "Jimmyl Jimmy! Stop that at once," she cried, and, making a grab at the kitten, rescued it from Its tor- menter. "What do you mean by being so cruel ,to the poor little thing?" she demanded. "I wasn't cruel," said 31mmy. "When dad was playing cards last night I heard him say, 'Now boys, there's at least five dollars in the kitty,' and well, I was trying to shake it out.' London Answers. The washer that is making electric washer history: the HAAG Vortex The world moves--the thing that was best yesterday is no longer best. A new idea brings an efficiency that yesterday's best could not obtain. This new HAAG VORTEX washer cuts minutes from every washerful of soiled clothes. A remarkable cleans- ing speed is the result of greater agitation of the suds. More clothes to each load means fewer loads--and the washing is done in an hour or two less time. This I-IAAG VORTIX has taken the country by storm and women everywhere are singing its praises. Let us demonstrate it in your own home. Easy terms, if desired. " E. E. J OHNSTON Monroe, Wash. Let Us Do Your Printing No, so...,, COMING SOON When the earl of Bradford was brought before the lord chancellor to be examined on the application for a statute of lunacy against him, the question was asked him from the wool- sack : "How many feet has a sheep?" "Does your lordship," answered Lord Bradford, "mean a live sheep, or a dead Sheep ?" "Is it not the same thing?" said the chancellor. "No, my lord," returned Lord Brad- ford. "There is much difference; a live sheep may have four legs, a dead sheep has only two; the two forelegs are shoulders, but there are only two legs 'of mutton W--Yorkshire (Eng.) Post. Cancer in Lower Animals Scientists seeking a cure for cancer have been attempting to find a solution for eir problem and to learn more of the nature of the growth by produc- ing it in animal specimens. Experi- me wlth rats and mice have shown that a certain kind of tar will cause cancerous formations six months after It is applied to the living tissue o$ the animals, and it was also found that cau,rs were produced in the stOm- achs of the specimens after they had eat cockroaches infested with a cert k4nd of worm. While the cure is being sought, efforts af'e also con- stably in progress to Improve existing metds of treatment to allay the rav- ages .of tim mysterious afflictlon.Cal- gary Herald• LET U DO YOUR n[|BnmJ Rexall One-Cent Sale Thursday, Friday, Saturday Oct. 15, 16, 17 REMEMBER THE DATE AT YOUR SERVICE Camp-Riley Drug Co. Drugs and Gift, MONROE, WASHINGTON