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Monroe Historical Society
Monroe, Washington
March 27, 1925     Monroe Historical Society
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March 27, 1925
 

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Friday, March 27, 1925 THE MONROE MONITOR--Monroe, Washington Page Five I R. J. STRETCH STRICTLY CASH NO DELIVERIES Stretch's High Grade Coffee 47c lb.; 3 lbs. $1.40. All Coffee--No Tin We Roast Our Own CASH AND CARRY I Stretch's High Grade Tea, % lb. pkgs. 30c; 1 lb. pkgs. 60c Fancy First Picking i WHAT ARE YOU PAYING? Phone 1 4 8 1 i Stretch's High Grade Cocoa, 22c lb.I All Cocoa--No Tin [ Why buy a tin can to throw away? Butter ................................................................................................ 49c Eggs .................................................................................................. 25c Cheese ................................................................................................ 27c Lard, 5 lb. pails ........................................................................ $1.00 Lard, 10 lb. pails ........................................................................ $1.95 Lard, bulk, 2 lbs. for .................................................................... 45c Amaizo Oil, quarts ...................................................................... 55c Crystal White Soap, 6 for ........................................................ 25c Cocoanut White Soap, 10 for ...................................................... 39c Creme Oil Soap, 5 for .............................................................. 39c Citrus Powder .................................................................................. 23c Booth's Sardines, 2 for ................................................................ 25c Quaker Quick Oats .................................................................... .. 30c Albers Minit Oats ...................................................................... 30c Mothers Oats (Premium) ......................................................... 35c Sweet Corn, 2 cans for .............................................................. 25c Sugar Peas, per can .................................................................. 14c FEEDS THAT SATISFY Scratch Feed ........................................................... : .................... $3.15 Egg Mash .................................................................................... $3.00 Dairy Feed .................................................................................... $1.90 Hog Feed .................................................................................... $2.00 Cracked Corn .............................................................................. $2.90 Ground Corn ............................................................................. $2.90 Ground Barley .............................................................................. $2.50 Alfalfa Leaves and Blossoms .............................................. $1.05 Beet Pulp .................................................................................... $2.50 We have Albers Little Chix Feed and Albers Chix Starter Mash. Pure Cane Sugar, 100 Ib sacks . $6.90 1 Pure Cane Sugar, 10 Ibs . . 70cl Fisher's Blend Flour, 49 Ib sacks. $2.75 WE SERVE YOU BETTER BY SELLING YOU MORE FOR LESS 0 +++++++++++++ LOCAL NEWS ITEMS + + ++++++++++++++++ Special for Friday, Saturday and Sunday only--Mexican peioche, 16c a pound; cookies, 15c doz., 2 doz, for 26c. The Everett Tent & Awning Co., Charles. A. Cole, proprietor, has mov- ed into its own home at 2821 Hoyt avenue, a fine, spacious structure which affords a larger and better service by this concern. Mr. Cole has been in the tent business in Everett for 23 years and therefore ranks among the pion,eer business men of that city. Special for Friday, Saturday and Sunday only--Mexican penoche, 16c a pound; cookies, 15c doz., 2 doz, for 26c. Two prisons cars passed through Monroe Wednesday on train No. 4, G. N., in which were about forty de- portees bound for the Atlantic sea- board for embarkation to their re- spective cotmtries. This collection of aliens was picked up along the Pacific coast by the fcdelal authorities. The J. M. Lempen home, and con- tents burned to almost a total loss from a fire which started last Sat- urday evening. The building was completely destroyed and much of the furniture and personal belong- ings, including clothing, bedding. The origin of the fire is presumed to be from an ovelheated stove. The family escaped injury very fortun- ately. The friends and neighbors of this family have come to their aid very nicely and which is duly ap- preciated by Mr. an Mrs. Lempen in this time of e.xtreme depression for them. Order a load cf wood and get your garbage hauled away to boot. Just have it ready in sacks or boxes. Monroe Independent Transfer, office, Central Garage. 2t2" When you want good tailor-made suits one-third off, call on Pilhnan Suit House. Suits made to order. 2008 Hewitt avenue, Everett. tl* The reformatory board held a meet- ing at the institution last Friday and Saturday and granted paroles to about eighty of the applicants for such clemency. The' inmate popu- lation of the reformatory at this time numbers 441. I will get my next suit from George Smith. Meeting of baseball club and fans at Community hall, Monday evening at 8 o'clock. Important. By T. C. Cromwell, president. Miss Winifred Williams and Mrs. Elizabeth Huff were among Seattle visitors over the week end. Special for Friday, Saturday and Sunday only--Mexican penoche, 16c a pound; cookies, 15c doz., 2 doz, for 26c. The Easter vacation of the state university schools is now on and the students are taking a respite from their books for the ten days of grace which began Wednesday. Studies will be resumed April: 1st. The R. J. Stretch Co.. through the cooperation of the Lilly Seed Co., are distributing free a very fine book on seeds. Now is the time to procure one 0f these books, invaluable because of the information contained therein anad well worth close perusal by those who desire to make the home grounds beautiful. Very fine and large assortment of spring hats at the Miss Jacobsen Millinery, Monroe. Prices to suit everybody. 2t2" The Ladies Auxiliary of the Ameri- can Legion will hold a food sale at the Stretch store on Saturday. April 4th. Cakes, pies, doughnuts, brown bread, etc., etc., will be on sale. Some very disagreeable lappenings in Monroe, juvenile in the matter of those guilty of these breaches of law which include bootlegging and house- breaking, have come to the notice of the Monitor and will be reviewed in an editorial way late. I Dr. and Mrs. C. W. Roben motored to Seattle on Tuesday, joining friends there for a theatre party in honor of their fourth wedding anniversary. ++++++++++++. PERSONAL ++4+++++++++++++++ Mr. Wise f the Stave Chevrolet compatny has rented the Dubuqtle house on south Lewis street, recently vacated by Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Easton. Mr. and Mrs. J. Milton Kepper of Ann Arbor, Mich., are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Hatch. Among University students home for th'e Easter holidays are Hart Bascom, Dale Brix, Claude Crank- shaw and Keiron Reardom Mr. and Mrs. Dan Wolfe, with Mrs. Fred Hagedorn, spent Wednes- day with Seattle friends. Messrs and Mesdames James E. Hatch, J. Milton Keppler of An Arbor, Michigan, spent Thursday in Everett. Great Skill Required in Training of Hawks Various kinds of hawks were trained for the purpose of falconry. Each bird lind Its own Style of flying and its own particular method of taking the quqrry, opinion as to which spe- cific kind of hawk was the best being divided. But of them all none was more gem erally popular than the noble pere- grtne---a first-rate flyer, docile, tract- able and extremely courageous, says Capt. C. W. R. Knight, M. C., in the pastime which once played so great a part In the lives of the English, and to which reference is made in the works of such authors as Shakespeare and Scott. For grouse hawking the female, be- tng a heavier, stronger bird than the male, Is generally used, for she Is bet- ter fitteu to take and hold a strong old cock grouse. She It Is who is called "falcon," the male being known as the "tlercl" because he Is one- third less In size than the female. The art of falconry consists In per- suading a naturally fierce, wild bird to do for her owner exr'.ctly what she would do in any case In the wild state--in short to display at close quarters the amazing powers of flight with which she has been equipped by nature. If she should be so successful in her flight as to strike her quarry, she dls- patches it immediately--and In most professional manner--a sharp bite at the base of the skull and it is all over. On the other hand, if the hawk fails to come up with her quarry---is perhaps ontflowu, beaten In the air-- she fails completely. The intended victim disappears, doubtless rejoicing, into the blue, and It Is up to the dis- consolate falconer to recover his erring charge as soon as he can. Farmer Ha# Advantage Over Dweller in City It is a common complaint that the farm and farm life are not appreci- ated by our people. We long for more elegant pursuits, or the ways and fashions of the town. But the farmer has the most sane and natural occu- pation and ought to find life sweeter, If less highly seasoned, than any oth- er. He alone, strictly speaking, has a .home. How can a man take root and thrive without land? He writes his history upon his field. How many ties, how many resources, he has---his friend- shllJs with his cattle, his team, his dog, his trees, the satisfaction In his growing crops, in his improved fields his intimacy with Nature, with bird and beast, and with the quickening elemental forces ; his co-operation with the clouds, the sun, the seasons, heat, wind, rain, frost l Nothing will take the various social distempers which the city and arti- ficial life breed out of a man like farming, like direct and loving contact with the soil. It draws out the poi- son. It humbles him, teaches him pa- tience and reverence, and restores the proper tone to his system.--John Bur- roug.. Wenatchee--Wenatchee & Southern railway to construct 133-mile line to Kennewick. Greek, City Once Home of the Apostle Paul Scholars state that St. Paul's short epistle to Titus was written during his short period of freedom after his first llnpris()nment In Rome, hut not long before his second imprisonment with which the scriptural account of the career of the great apostle termi- nates. In the twelfth verse of the third chapter St. Paul directs Titus to come to hhn at Nlcopolis, "'for 1 have determined there to winter." This Nlcopolls was the celebrated city of Eplrus. It was known as the "City of Victoria" and was built by the em- peror Augustus In memory of his naval victory at Actium over the com- bined forces of Ant(my and Cleopatra. This victory practically made Octa- vius, later Augustus, the ruler of the Roman empire. The battle of Actium was fought in the year 31 B. C., and four years laterAOctavius was pro- claimed emperor With the title of Au- gustus. Nicopolis stood on a penin- sula on the west coast of Greece and on one side of the peninsula was the bay of Actium, the scene of the hattie that takes its name from that of the bay. According to tradition, it was at Nlcopolis that St. Paul was made a prisoner for the second time and car- ried to Rome. Homing Instinct Strongly Developed in the Pig A pig belonging to a Texas farmer was sold to a dealer who lived eigllt mi!es away. The morning after the sale the pig reappeared in its old sty, having escaped from Its new quarters during the night. The homing Instinct Is stronger In the plg than In most animals. An in- stance similar to the above occurred In Illinois, where a pig traveled 14 miles back to its old home, after be- ing sold In a local market. Darwin believed the pig capable of developing the sagacity of a dog. For example, a sow belonging to a Wis- consin farmer was trained to hunt game, at which it became more ex- pert than most pointers. The fame of this animal spread far and wide, and tempting offers were made to buy It. Records show that pigs In former days were often used as beasts of bur- den, while there is at least one well- authenticated instance of a pig being employed for rounding up sheep. Per- haps the most curious use to which the species has ever been put was to draw a carriage for an eccentrlc'Eng- lish nobleman. " Young Wolves in Packs As a rule, wolves travel In packs only In the winter. The mating sea- son for most wolves is In December and January. The young a. . born in burrows usually excavated by the wolves themselves. During the period of confinement the male feeds the fe- male. There are generally from four to six cubs in a litter. They are blind for 21 days and are suckled for about two months. At the end of one month they are able to eat half di- gested flesh disgorged by the mother. They usually quit their parents in No- vember or December, Just before the pairing season, when they are less than a year old, but frequently the young remain together six or eight months longer. Wolves reach matur- Ity in about three years. Hence the only young wolves found In packs are half-grown wolves which have left their mothers.Pathflnder Magazine. Imperative ot Happine All high happiness has in It some element of love; all love contains a desire for peace. One Immediate ef- fect )f new happiness, new love, Is to make us turn toward the past with a wish to straighten out its difficulties, heal ItS breaches, forgive its wrongs. We think most hopefully of distressing things which may still be remedied, most regretfully of others that have passed beyond our reach and wilL--i J. L. Allen. Raymond16 blocks of streets to be paved. Langview--$100,000 library build- ing to be erectio.n. Russian Chitdren Have Brief Carefree Moments Presently there came to us the sound of a tambourine and the sing- lag of youthful voices. The children who had been standing In groups lis- tening to their wrangling elders d?tshed Joyously into the street. Nikl- for hooked his arm into mine and bade me follow him. Soon there passed before us a pro$sslon of young people headed by the village band-- an accordion and a tambourine. The girls followed directly behind the players. They were In holiday attire, white waists, neqt little aprons, some in big shoes, others barefooted. They walked arm in arm with one another. The boys, also in Sunday clothes, trailed after them. They were all singing In lusty resonant voices an age-old melody of a Cossack killing a gipsy who threatened to stell his sweetheart. It was to me a beautiful and thrilling sight--these boys and girls, barefoot, many of them, in oh] though freshly laundered ch)thes, walking briskly and in step, ohlivious or unmindful of the cares that pressed with brutal agony upon their fathers. and giving themselves with Joyous abandon to song and play, and it made me forget for the moment the ugly mud. the dingy hovels and the multi- tude of embittered souls wailing with sullen piteousness at the fate that had befallen them.--Maurlce G. Hin- dus in he Yale Review. Machine Puts on Record Development of Plants A wonderful machine has been In- vented which measures the growth of plants. A small thread connects the plant with the apparatus, which con- sists of an electrical battery and a drum which revolves slowly. Above this drum is a pen worked by electricity. As the plant grows the thread slackens, and causes a connection between the battery and pen. The latter drops onto the drum and makes a mark. At the same time a small rod is pushed up, which tight- ens the string again. Thus the drum shows the growth of the plant over a given period, and information is ob- tained showing the effect of heat and light upon various specimens. It has been proved that most plants grow more rapidly at night, and this fact has been of great assistance to those engaged in Sorcing the growth of flowers and vegetables. Torpedo It is curio'us that a projectile which is famous for its swift action oice it Is started on its way should have been derived from the word "torpid." But "torpid" is the origin of our word "tor- pedo." The word "torpid" has two mean-" lngs. One is what the word generally deslgnateslack of motion or feeling. The other Is, by association, a kind of racing boat used at Oxford univer- sity. The torpedo is in one sense a racing boat, but It Is In no sense tor- pid once It is set in motion to do its deadly work. Only before It has been fired is the torpedo a torpid or inactive object. After that simple process has been performed It is, generally speaking, as effective as lightning when It strikes. --Chicago JournaL Collector's Queer'Hobby The world is full of "collectors." Collectors of stamps, coins, spoons, autographs, etc., etc., and now comes the collection of beer bottle labels. A London dealer recently offered for sale, for $275, 10,000 beer-bottle labels, carefully preserved in 15 albums. They comprise fine clean specimens from nearly every brewery in the world, of beautiful design and artistic merit. A noted collector has spent 50 years In traveling and getting them to- gether. Many of the breweries repre- sented have been closed down, and the brands are obsolete. Washington capitalists and federal geologists to test oil possibilities of state. Zilla-- A. E. March company to erect cold storage plant. Toadstones Certain black pebbles, known as toadstones, which toads were reputed to carry In their heads, though of lit- tle beauty as ornaments, were highly esteemed during the dark ages be- cause of their alleged power to heal various kinds of digestive disorders and for their supposed protective Influ- ence over children. The wearer of one was thought hnmune from toothache; they were held as antidotes for poisons and believed to warn of the approach of a venomous reptile by imparting a stinging sensation to the flesh.--Popu- lar Mechanics Magazine. Early Days of Boxing In the early days of boxing there was no thne limit to the length of a round, which might last for one second or One hour. It ended only with a knock-down, and not more than thirty seconds was allowed for rest and re- covery. The knockout blow had not rhea been Invented. Consequently, contests were likely to be prolonged far beyond what is the case nowadays, when championship battles that are counted in terms of seconds are by no means uncommon. TRY A MONITOR WANT AD-- SMALL BUT EFFICIENT. NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC Fern Bluff Creamery butter is sold by every store in Monroe, and if you do no get our butter it's because certain stores refuse to continue giving us the business. Anyone tell- mg you we refused to sell iny store in Monroe or elsewhere, is doing so for the intent purpose of boycotting our product, which is butter. Fern Bluff butter has been manu- factured in Monroe for 11 years and it is our intention to keep our factory here as long as we receive patronage, otherwise we will move our business to a larger city where we will have greater advantages, and more able to compete with other large cream- eries. Monroe in 1924 consumed 64,000 pounds of creamery butter, less than one-tenth the butter manu- factured by us was sold in Moroe. Three hundred thousand pounds were sold in Los Angeles and San Fran- cisco. Everett at the present rate of consumption, will take from our factory the coming year, one hund- red and sixty-two thousand pounds of Fern Bluff Creamery butter. If this factory is worth keeping in Monroe, we kindly ask your patronage. (Signed) C. E. GUSTIN, 2tl Proprietor. Furniture upholstered, auto tops made and repaired. Auto Top Shop, Monroe. STYLEPLUS '[7 L 0 T H E S i \\; / o What do young men want in clothes? They want fachionable clothes with a dapper air, without being extreme. Made in good wearing fabrics in smartly colored patterns. Made from all wool fabrics in snappy patterns which are so very popular right now. Clothes which are sold every- where for-- $25 $40 Designed and Tailored for Young Men .I.E. WOOD CO. THE BEST FIRE INSURANCE .AND00 LOWEST RATES Some Insurance Companies are using the "Reduced Rate Average Clause" in writing Fire Insurance and thus giviag reduced rates ranging from 5 per cent to 20 per cent below standar& rates. I can do that and then besides give you from 10 per cent to 20 per cent off, so that it will pay you to see me when you need Insurance. Call, phone or write E. T. BASCOM MONITOR BUILDING Monroe, Washington